Binary search c algorithms for digital signal processing


C Programming for Music Technology is an intensive, graduate-level introductory course in programming concepts and binary search c algorithms for digital signal processing science with a focus on software design, algorithms, and data representation for digital signal processing and other audio applications.

Assignments consist of extensive programming in C. No prior programming experience is required. Schedule The following is the course schedule, subject to change: Thursday, September 6 Statements, variables; types; casting; format strings for output; relational operators; precedence; boolean expressions; conditional statements; logical operators; note on style.

Unit 2 Thursday, September 13 Switch statements; constants; arrays. Problem Set 1 due at 8pm Thursday, September 20 Functions; scope; command-line arguments; ciphers. Thursday, September 27 Random number generation; Monte Carlo simulations; recursion. Unit 4 Thursday, October 4 Stack; automatic vs. Thursday, October 25 Structs revisited; break and continue; single-linked lists. Thursday, November binary search c algorithms for digital signal processing Binary search trees; tries; assembly; volatile; extern; unions.

Tuesday, November 6 Quiz 2 on material through Unit 4. Problem Set 5 design. Unit 7 Thursday, November 15 Twos complement; floating-point representation; bitwise operators. Problem Set 6 due at 8pm Tuesday, November 27 Spell-checker competition. Problem Set 7 design. Problem Set 7 due at 8pm Sunday, December 9: Final Project Wednesday, December 19 Final project implementation and documentation due at midnight Thursday, December 20 Final project presentation, pm Class Times Lectures take place in the Education building 35 W.

Problem Sets Binary search c algorithms for digital signal processing problem sets will be distributed during the semester. Each will be due via electronic submission on Blackboard.

You have seven "late days" that you may use during the semester, each of which provides you with an extension of 24 hours. The extensions can be distributed in any way you like--e. No reason needs to be given; whether you are ill, too busy with other things, or just don't feel like turning it in, it doesn't matter--how you use them is up to you.

Lateness of electronic submissions will be determined down to the minute by the submission timestamps on Blackboard. If the problem set is due at 2pm and you submit it at 2: Also note that some of the problem sets have mutliple parts that are due on different dates. Each day an individual part is late counts as a late day.

You may not use any late days on the course's final project. When computing your final grade, your lowest score on these problem sets will be dropped and your six highest scores will be weighted equally. Quizzes The course will have three hour-long quizzes. These quizzes will be "closed-book. You should expect the second binary search c algorithms for digital signal processing third quizzes to be cumulative, but their content will be based mostly on lectures subsequent to those covered by the first and second quizzes, respectively.

When computing your final grade, your lowest score on these quizzes will be dropped and your two highest scores will be weighted equally. Final Project The final project binary search c algorithms for digital signal processing be your opportunity to put your programming skills to use and implement your own software application. As long as your project is written mostly in C, the nature of your project is entirely up to you, albeit subject to the instructor's approval.

You are welcome to utilize external libraries and hardware provided that the instructor has access to all of these things and you are able to present it in class at the end of the semester. You may work together with up to two other students, however work is expected to be distributed equally among project partners and the project itself must be commensurate in scope.

Each student is expected to contribute approximately lines of code to a project, whether working alone or with a group. If multiple students are working on a project, the code must be thoroughly documented to indicate which student wrote or contributed to each part.

Extensions on the final project will not be granted, except in cases binary search c algorithms for digital signal processing emergency. Work submitted late without extension will be penalized as follows: Lateness of submissions will be determined down to the minute by timestamps.

Final Exam This course does not have a final exam. The Audio Programming BookR. Grades Final grades for the lecture class will be determined using the following weights: Problem Sets best 6 out of 7: Academic Honesty All work you do for the class is expected to be your own.

Collaborating with others unless explicitly allowed as well as copying material in any form from an individual, book, website, or any other source is strictly prohibited, as is allowing another student to copy or use your own work in any way.

You are welcome to discuss the course's material with others in order to better understand it. You may even discuss problem sets with classmates, but you may not share or write code together. The only possible exceptions to this is the final project, if you are working together with other students or utilizing an outside library or API.

Acknowledgements This class owes much of its structure and content to Harvard's Computer Science 50, a course that the instructor took as an undergraduate many years ago. Data representations for signal processing and audio applications. Thursday, September 13 Switch statements; constants; arrays. Thursday, October 4 Stack; automatic vs. Problem Set 4 Part I due at 8pm. Tuesday, October 23 Dynamic memory allocation and deallocation. Thursdsay, November 8 Intro to audio programming library; PortAudio.

Thursday, November 15 Twos complement; floating-point representation; bitwise operators. Wednesday, December 19 Final project implementation and documentation due at midnight Thursday, December 20 Final project presentation, pm.