Consider a day trading option


If you take both considerations into account you can adjust your trading plan accordingly. Your broker will help facilitate your traders. Today there are numerous online brokers to choose from. The challenge is finding one that meets your individual needs. Strategies for day trading options come in all shapes and sizes, some straightforward and some complicated.

Before we look at an example, there are a couple of essential components most strategies will need. Your chart will require the best indicators for trading options. These vary from strategy to strategy, but they include:.

Not just when you enter and exit the trade though, but also when you set up for the trading day ahead. Options strategies that work usually have a trader behind them who is up bright and early. For example, you may want to be up as early as You can start setting up your trading strategy based on what your market has done throughout the night. If you know this you can also know if most stocks will open up or down when the US market opens at 9: Day trading on options requires careful analysis and significant time.

This is one of the basic options strategies that work. If the market is on the rise you will buy calls or sell puts. Many prefer to sell options than buy them. However, some equities move so well that purchasing the option can yield greater profits than selling the option and waiting for it to go downhill. Apple is one such example. Now you sit back and wait for half an hour to see if you traded in the right direction. If the market turns then get out. There are plenty more opportunities out there.

If the market continues in your direction you could stay with it and place your stop to the other side of the open by around cents.

If it continues to look promising you can re-evaluate again at around 3: You can then make a final decision and hopefully count your profits. Even with nifty options day trading techniques, you can always benefit from invaluable tips. From risk management and stock options tips to education and rules around tax, below you will find top tips that could keep you firmly in the black.

One of the top tips is to immerse yourself in the educational resources around you. Put and call options are some of the greatest trading vehicles ever created.

But day-trading the options is not one of those strategies. Options are simply the wrong tool for that particular job, like trying to cut a board with a tape measure, drive a car to an island or cook a steak in a microwave. The first issue is that of trading liquidity and bid-ask spreads. For almost all options, the bid-ask spreads, as a percentage of their value, are much too wide for day trading purposes, although not a problem for longer duration trades.

We enter and exit trades with precision timing as the price of the asset touches small-scale demand and supply zones. This can be very effective and lucrative, but it requires quick trade entries and exits.

When we buy an option, if we want to get it done that quickly we will have to pay the asking price for it. Later, when we sell it, we will have to accept the bid price. When we have the time to wait, we can avoid paying the full spread by using limit orders. In day trading there is no time for that. That alone pretty much rules out options as a day trading vehicle. Nevertheless, the same customer has generated financial risk throughout the day. The day-trading margin rules address this risk by imposing a margin requirement for day trading that is calculated based on a day trader's largest open position in dollars during the day, rather than on his or her open positions at the end of the day.

The SEC received over comment letters in response to the publication of these rule changes. Day trading refers to buying then selling or selling short then buying the same security on the same day. Just purchasing a security, without selling it later that same day, would not be considered a day trade.

As with current margin rules, all short sales must be done in a margin account. If you sell short and then buy to cover on the same day, it is considered a day trade. Your brokerage firm also may designate you as a pattern day trader if it knows or has a reasonable basis to believe that you are a pattern day trader. For example, if the firm provided day-trading training to you before opening your account, it could designate you as a pattern day trader.

Would I still be considered a pattern day trader if I engage in four or more day trades in one week, then refrain from day trading the next week? In general, once your account has been coded as a pattern day trader, the firm will continue to regard you as a pattern day trader even if you do not day trade for a five-day period. This is because the firm will have a "reasonable belief" that you are a pattern day trader based on your prior trading activities.

However, we understand that you may change your trading strategy. You should contact your firm if you have decided to reduce or cease your day trading activities to discuss the appropriate coding of your account.

This collateral could be sold out if the securities declined substantially in value and were subject to a margin call. The typical day trader, however, is flat at the end of the day i. Therefore, there is no collateral for the brokerage firm to sell out to meet margin requirements and collateral must be obtained by other means. Accordingly, the higher minimum equity requirement for day trading provides the brokerage firm a cushion to meet any deficiencies in the account resulting from day trading.

The credit arrangements for day-trading margin accounts involve two parties -- the brokerage firm processing the trades and the customer. The brokerage firm is the lender and the customer is the borrower. No, you can't use a cross-guarantee to meet any of the day-trading margin requirements. Each day-trading account is required to meet the minimum equity requirement independently, using only the financial resources available in the account.

What happens if the equity in my account falls below the minimum equity requirement?